Nic Dakin MP

Standing up for Local People

News

3383 children will go hungry in North Lincolnshire over the summer holidays as they will not be able to access the free school meal they were entitled to during term time.

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Across Yorkshire and the Humber there will be a total of 129,940 children going hungry without their free school meal, and a total of 300,000 children growing up in poverty will be at risk of going hungry over the summer.

New Trussell Trust data shows increasing reliance on food banks during the summer, with 47% of food parcels that went to children going to primary school aged children.

Across Yorkshire and the Humber hundreds of thousands of children are at risk of going hungry over the holidays.

The worst affected will be the 129,940 children who will no longer receive the free school meal they were eligible for during term time. There are 3383 of these children in our area, who will go hungry because their families don’t have the money to make ends meet.

There will be a total of 300,000 children at risk of going hungry this summer across the region, as they are growing up in poverty and their families may not have the money they need to make sure the children are fed.

Real wages are falling in real terms as inflation rises, which will leave more children at risk of going hungry.

Commenting on these numbers Scunthorpe Labour MP Nic Dakin said:

“It is unacceptable that so many children are at risk of going hungry in our community.

“Child poverty is at a seven year high, and wages are falling, leaving working families worse off.

“Every child deserves to be well fed every day, and Labour will introduce a Real Living Wage of £10 an hour to ensure that every family is able to make ends meet.”

3383 children will go hungry in North Lincolnshire

3383 children will go hungry in North Lincolnshire over the summer holidays as they will not be able to access the free school meal they were entitled to during term...

I was pleased to join cross-party MPs at an event on to celebrate the number of people who are registered as stem cell donors.

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The All Party Parliamentary Group on Stem Cell Transplantation, supported by blood cancer charity and stem cell register Anthony Nolan, held the event to mark the progress made by the transplant community in the past year.

In Scunthorpe, the number of potential stem cell donors registered with Anthony Nolan is 426. 42% of these donors are male, and the average age is 36.

In total, 645,000 people in the UK are on the Anthony Nolan register, any of whom could be a match for someone with blood or bone marrow cancer and asked to donate their stem cells to give a patient a second chance of life.

I am encouraging more people from Scunthorpe, particularly men aged 16-30 and people from black, Asian and ethnic minority backgrounds, to register as stem cell donors and make sure that a match is available for everyone in need of a transplant. While anyone on the register could be a match for someone with blood cancer, men aged 16-30 are most likely to be asked to donate, and are currently underrepresented on the register. There is also a shortage of donors from non-white and mixed-race backgrounds.

Register as a stem cell donor

I was pleased to join cross-party MPs at an event on to celebrate the number of people who are registered as stem cell donors. The All Party Parliamentary Group on...

On Wednesday of this week I joined the Bank of England’s Chief Cashier, Victoria Cleland, in Parliament to find out more about the new £10 note featuring the world-renowned author Jane Austen.

I was able to test the new tactile feature on the £10 note which helps blind and vision impaired users identify their value – a first for Bank of Englandbanknotes. The tactile feature is a series of raised dots in the top left-hand corner and has been developed in conjunction with the RNIB (Royal National Institute of Blind People). This is in addition to the elements already incorporated in Bank of England banknotes for vision impaired people; the tiered sizing, bold numerals, raised print and differing colour palettes.

The new £10 note celebrates the life of Jane Austen whose novels are loved by many across the world. The Bank is proud to mark her contribution to British culture, particularly in this anniversary year and we are looking forward to the note entering circulation from 14 September.

As it is made of polymer, the new £10 note is cleaner, safer and stronger. It joins the Churchill Bank of England £5 note in the first family of polymer Bank of England banknotes and a new £20 note featuring J.M.W Turner will follow in 2020. The £10 note contains sophisticated security features which make it very difficult to counterfeit. It will last at least 2.5 times longer than the current paper £10 notes – around 5 years in total – and stay in better condition during day to day use.

The new £10 note will be issued on 14 September 2017, so the public here in Scunthorpe will begin to see them in the following days and weeks as the notes leave cash centres around the country and enter general circulation. The public can continue to spend paper £10 notes as usual and these will be gradually withdrawn as they are banked by retailers and the public. Legal tender status of the paper £10 featuring Charles Darwin will be withdrawn in Spring 2018 with the exact date being announced at least three months in advance.

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Launch of New £10 Note

On Wednesday of this week I joined the Bank of England’s Chief Cashier, Victoria Cleland, in Parliament to find out more about the new £10 note featuring the world-renowned author Jane...

This week I took the opportunity to lend my support to a new ivory surrender initiative launched by the International Fund for Animal Welfare - IFAW to help protect elephants from further slaughter for the illegal ivory trade.

Members of the public are being invited to surrender their own ivory which will be destroyed as part of a campaign to close the UK’s ivory market and save this iconic species from the threat of extinction.

IFAW, which has run previous successful public ivory surrenders in the UK, believes it is vital now more than ever before that the British public stand up for elephants by helping to end consumer demand for ivory products and keep up the pressure for a domestic ban on the ivory trade.

New polling released by IFAW reveals that the vast majority of the UK public want to protect elephants with a UK trade ban and do not wish to purchase ivory themselves. An overwhelming 95% of respondents polled by YouGov stated that they would not be interested in purchasing antique ivory.

With elephant populations at an all-time low and the species facing extinction due to the ivory poaching crisis which is killing at least 20,000 elephants each year, I am very pleased to support this important IFAW initiative which enables members of the public to make a real difference for elephants and their future survival. I would encourage any of my constituents who have unwanted ivory to support IFAW’s ivory surrender which will help ensure that ivory is only valued on a live, wild elephant, where it belongs.

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Close the UK's Ivory Market

This week I took the opportunity to lend my support to a new ivory surrender initiative launched by the International Fund for Animal Welfare - IFAW to help protect elephants from further...

I had no hesitation in accepting an invitation to attend The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (UK) event at the House of Commons recently and show my support for the campaign to end problem pavement parking.

At the event, I heard from guide dog owners how parked cars blocking the pavement force them to walk in the road, into the path of traffic they cannot see. I heard that some guide dog owners face these dangerous situations on a daily basis, risking their safety every time they go shopping or make the school run.

Research by YouGov for the charity Guide Dogs shows that 54% of UK drivers admit to parking on the pavement, with more than a quarter (29%) of those doing so a few times a month or more. More than half (55%) of these drivers do think about the impact on people with sight loss, but park on the pavement anyway.

Pavement parking particularly affects people with visual impairments, parents with pushchairs, wheelchair users and other disabled people. According to a Guide Dogs survey, 97% of blind and partially sighted people have encountered obstacles on the pavement, and 9 out of 10 have had problems with pavement parked cars.

Guide Dogs is campaigning for to make pavement parking an offence, except in areas where local authorities grant specific exemptions. This is already the case in London, but elsewhere across the country, councils struggle to tackle unsafe pavement parking because they can only restrict it street by street.

No one should be forced to brave traffic by cars parked on the pavement. I’m calling on the Government to end problem pavement parking across the country. Blind and partially sighted people should be able to walk the streets without fear.

Below is a picture of myself with Guide Dogs Volunteer, Richard along with puppy, Prudie.

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Guide Dogs Campaign to End Problem Pavement Parking

I had no hesitation in accepting an invitation to attend The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (UK) event at the House of Commons recently and show my support for the campaign...

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