Nic Dakin MP

Standing up for Local People

Young People

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Earlier this week, Nic led a debate in Parliament on the topic of teaching mindfulness in schools.

A lot of people suffer from mental health disorders while they are in school. In fact around one in ten people aged 5-16 are suffering from a mental health disorder. This works out at around three people in each class. Depression figures have doubled since the 1980’s showing that showing that problems with mental health is increasing. In fact figures show around half of people who suffer mental health issues as a child, find themselves suffering again as an adult.

Mindfulness can be as simple as sitting down in a quiet space, closing your eyes and focusing on your breathing. This could be done for a few minutes or for a longer time. You can either focus on your breathing or focus on what you are feeling. Another form of mindfulness is to do an ordinary task but to focus on what all of your senses are feeling at the time and any thoughts that come to mind- instead of other thoughts such as planning your shopping list.

Ways that schools could bring mindfulness into school could be by PSHE, role play sessions in drama lessons or even by running yoga sessions- either as part of the school day or even in physical education lessons.

There are some studies that have shown that mindfulness is very effective at reducing depression, anxiety and stress. Young people can suffer from lots of stress from exams, friends and all types of things which makes mindfulness a very good thing to be able to do.

The evidence that we have seen from studies shows that there is a strong case for mindfulness to be up scaled in schools.

 

Jessica's Blog: Mindfulness in Schools

Earlier this week, Nic led a debate in Parliament on the topic of teaching mindfulness in schools. A lot of people suffer from mental health disorders while they are in...

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The North Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is an NHS organisation which is responsible for local health services in North Lincolnshire.

The aim of CCGs’ are to put local GPs and nurses in a position which means they can develop the services that local residents need.

The main role of the CCG is to assess the regions health needs and to ensure that sustainable, high quality healthcare services are put into place. This needs to be achieved within the budget set out by the Government.

Various challenges face the CCG including  a growth in the older population- around 1 in 5 of North Lincolnshire’s population are over 65 years old which is higher than the national figures, treatments becoming more expensive and more people living with one or more serious long term health conditions.

The North Lincolnshire CCG have recently published their third Annual Report which sets out where and what the funds that the funds are spent on.

The funds provided to the CCG have to be split into many different areas- the main one being hospital services. Over half of the funds go to the hospitals. Other areas include mental health community health, GPs (just under a quarter) and prescriptions (just under a quarter) - amongst many other areas.

 

Jessica's Blog: The CCG

The North Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is an NHS organisation which is responsible for local health services in North Lincolnshire. The aim of CCGs’ are to put local GPs...

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In the last two weeks, I’ve spent three days in Leeds on two different training courses.

Monday morning, I woke up bright and early to catch my first train to Leeds. When I arrived I began trying to navigate my way to the building that the course would be in. However my phones GPS decided to mess around and managed to turn a ten minute walk into a forty-five minute one! But I made it there in the end, and still very early.

The course I was attending was a two day crash course on welfare benefits, where we essentially covered the entire system in two days. To look at so many different benefits and to see how they all interact with one another was very interesting.

At the end of my first day in Leeds, I boarded my train home (and despite a close encounter with a wrong train I managed to get home).

On the Tuesday morning, I was up early again for my train back to Leeds for day two. This was personally my most interesting day as we were tackling areas that I have deep interest in- such as DLA and PIP. That afternoon we also began looking at the basics of universal credit- laying the brickworks ready for the course the following Monday on universal credit.

Though delays, cancelled trains and bus replacements lead to chaos on my way home that night, it didn’t put me off.

My second course began on the following Monday- looking solely at Universal Credit. To be quite honest, on my first course I had struggled to understand this but very quickly I began to understand and pick up the information we were given.

Both of my courses were extremely informative and interesting- giving me key knowledge that I can use when researching and drafting documents in relation to welfare benefits and universal credit. I thoroughly enjoyed my time there. 

Jessica's Blog: Training Courses

In the last two weeks, I’ve spent three days in Leeds on two different training courses. Monday morning, I woke up bright and early to catch my first train to...

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Wednesday morning I packed up my belongings and made my way back into Parliament (with the help of a security guard to get me through doors) so that I could leave my belongings in Nic’s office. I then made my way down to Westminster Hall, the meeting point for my tour of Parliament- both the House of Commons and the House of Lords. The experience was remarkable. The sights within Parliament are breath-taking and quite simply beautiful. The information that the tour guide gave to us was interesting and things that I hadn’t really considered before. (Such as the damage of a statues sword from the Suffragette movement.)

Once my tour ended, I followed the route that Nic had shown me the night before. There was a debate occurring on the implications of the EU on steel industry, which I got into for the last half an hour. It was an interesting experience to see how a debate actually occurs.

The Wednesday also brought along the last PMQ’s for David Cameron and Nic was fortunate enough to be able to snag me a highly fought over ticket to watch from the public gallery. This was amazing for me, to actually sit in the gallery and see this in person. Proceeding this, I joined the crowds to watch David Cameron and his family leave Westminster for Downing Street.

I then had around an hour to spare before I was due to meet back with Nic. I spent this time walking around Parliament and taking in the sights even more.

When I joined Nic again, we were meeting a group of students from St Lawrence’s school who had come down for a youth debate on religious education in schools. Before the debate happened, the MP for each schools constituency were running a tour of Parliament. This was particularly good for me as only hours before I had been on the official tour so I had little bits of information that I could contribute to our tour.

The debate that the pupils from across the country took part in was extremely interesting- it was being run as an official formal debate and the pupils all performed and expressed their views very well. Unfortunately, I had to miss the end of this in order to catch my tube back home. 

Jessica's Blog: London Part Two

Wednesday morning I packed up my belongings and made my way back into Parliament (with the help of a security guard to get me through doors) so that I could...

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Where do I begin with describing the week that I’ve had?

The last few weeks have been simply remarkable. On the 12th I set off to start my journey down to London to work in Nic’s Westminster office for two days. Still rather new to trains, the journey down was an adventure. Venturing onto the Tube was a new experience, luckily I avoided rush hour! When I left the tube I began my short walk to Portcullis House to actually get into Parliament.

When I arrived and had been security cleared, Lawrence collected me to go up to Nic’s office. Lorraine- Nic’s office manager- was also present in London. Therefore, the three of us went for lunch before the collection of my Parliament pass- to allow me to go around Parliament without an escort.

Upon collection of my pass, it was time for my tour of the House of Commons library which was quite simply remarkable. My tour guide was also extremely good and I had a very interesting talk with her. The library was vast and quite breath-taking and somewhere I would really like to experience again.

After this, my tour guide helped me find the room I was looking for, for a talk by the library on changes to ESA. This was an interesting introduction and explanation of the system (which I furthered this week).

After this, Lawrence showed me where my hotel was so that I could leave my bags in my room. When we returned to Parliament, I joined Nic where he showed me where I needed to go in the morning. After this, I sat in the central lobby and took in the sights while Nic went to vote. We then attended a select committee meeting before we separated our own ways for the evening.

Just to explore London in the evening was remarkable. The last time I visited London was five years ago so I’d quite honestly forgotten how exquisite the sites really are. In fact I found myself walking and taking in the sites for over two hours before I returned to my hotel. 

Jessica's Blog: London Part One

Where do I begin with describing the week that I’ve had? The last few weeks have been simply remarkable. On the 12th I set off to start my journey down...

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