Nic Dakin MP

Standing up for Local People

Young People

Emily.jpgHi, my name is Emily and I’m 17. I have just finished my first year at John Leggott College having completed AS levels in Sociology, Religious Studies, History and Politics. I would love to do a degree in Theology when I leave college. Besides having an interest in politics and current affairs I also love to read, play the guitar and sing; sometimes I even do all three at once whilst reading the news.

Although I am in Nic’s office for one week only I am hoping to develop my communication, articulation and written skills whilst here by publishing different articles throughout the week. This will also help me with my current politics studies. Being here for the week will give me valuable work experience to place on my University application and allows potential future employers to know I have had experience of working in a professional environment.

Although I have no plans to enter into a political career I am positive that this placement will give me the confidence I need to enter into any career avenue that I wish to pursue. Considering politics impacts on the lives of so many and intertwines within so many professions I am certain my time here shall be of topmost value to help me on my way within any pathway I choose.

Emily's Blog

Hi, my name is Emily and I’m 17. I have just finished my first year at John Leggott College having completed AS levels in Sociology, Religious Studies, History and Politics.... Read more

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It’s been just over five months since I started my placement in the office and time has flown by. During my time so far I have picked up and developed so many skills that will hopefully give me a strong edge when applying to university.

Though I already had fairly decent skills on research, I feel I have really developed these skills to a level I never thought I could- this will also help me vastly for my Extended Project Qualification when college starts again. I have also increased my skills in taking vast amounts of information from multiple sources and fact checking to select the key parts of information. I have also improved my skills in writing for different audiences- from primary school children to adults.

It has been great to attend canvasing sessions- this essentially is door knocking and posting leaflets to houses within the constituency. This is something that is key, in particular in the run up to matters such as elections. Previously, I hadn’t imagined doing this and had quite frankly been rather scary until I actually started and found that I quite enjoyed it.

I have also done tasks such as putting events in Nic’s diary- this is something that needs to be done accurately or else could cause chaos. I also have spent time collecting and organising data to form spreadsheets for matters such as thank you letters. I have also drafted documents, some of which to go with the spreadsheets. Through this, I learnt important skills such as how to carry out a mail merge. On one occasion, I sat in some meetings that Nic had with constituents to see a sample of some of the matters that an MP deals with within their constituency.

 Next week I won’t be in the constituency office as I will have just returned from working in Nic’s Westminster office. This is something I am extremely excited about. Whilst there I will also take on new skills and see the work that happens within Westminster. When I am there, I will update my blog on what I’ve been up to. Some things that I’ll be doing in Westminster include a full tour, a talk in the House of Commons library and even attending the Prime Ministers Question Time. 

A few days after I return from Westminster, I will be going to Leeds to attend the first of the two courses I have signed up for, to improve my knowledge for drafting documents for Nic. The first course I’m attending is a two day course on Welfare Benefits. The following Monday, I will return to Leeds for a course on Universal Credit. These will be an interesting experience which will deepen my skills.

Jessica's Blog: My Time So Far

It’s been just over five months since I started my placement in the office and time has flown by. During my time so far I have picked up and developed...

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The country made the wrong decision and it is one that will ultimately impact every person in the country’s lives.

It is estimated that in the age bracket of 18-24 that only 36% actually voted in the referendum. This is shockingly low for such a high profile event that will effect this age brackets lives the most. People in this age bracket are those who will live and be impacted the most. However from this 36%, around 75% voted to remain. Surely if the other 64% had voted, there would have been a much higher chance of remain winning.

A prominent issue that arose in the lead up to the referendum was that people didn’t want an unelected official in charge, having a say in the laws that would impact Britain. Yet what will we have now? Following the result, David Cameron announced that he is stepping down in October for the next leader of the Conservatives to take over as Prime Minister. Whoever they may be, they certainly haven’t been elected. They haven’t faced a general election with the party. They will lack a mandate. The only ones who will have a say are the members of the Conservative party. The general public get no say. There will be an unelected official running the country as Prime Minister and impacting and making our laws.

Studying abroad schemes at university are something that many people aspire to go on, to visit and be educated in another country. One of the largest providers of this is the Erasmus scheme which is based within the EU. This scheme allows for students who are studying abroad but still within the European Union to receive support and scholarships to assist them whilst in a new country. But this will no longer assist British students when we have officially left.

The EU have been very clear since the referendum. If Britain want to access the single market, we will have to agree to the freedom of movement. This quite simply means that Britain will have to allow immigration and such to gain access. This goes against a major part of the Leave campaign, and a crucial factor that led to the ultimate decision to leave.

Finally, what will be left of the United Kingdom? Ireland are calling for reunification, Scotland are calling for a second independence referendum. If both are successful, we could be left with only Wales and England. 

Jessica's Blog: The EU Referendum

The country made the wrong decision and it is one that will ultimately impact every person in the country’s lives. It is estimated that in the age bracket of 18-24...

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Blog 3

Today I visited The Admin Centre and saw what a beneficial job they do in reducing unemployment in both youth and older people. The innovative idea rents out office space and meeting rooms to small businesses and medium businesses.

Listening to the guest speakers showed me that the future for North Lincolnshire is quite positive and learnt about the multiple different schemes such as UK steel enterprise and lake side housing.

The UK steel enterprise has been around for the last 40 years and believe in putting back into areas that have been affected by the privatization of the steel industry by offering loans of up to ¾ of a million pounds. This doesn’t just go into the steel industry projects though and can be given from IT to engineering for instance project saved

Project saved

A football project for Teesside youth which cut drug and alcohol abuse in the area. Also this reduced anti-social behaviour involving young people. When this was about to stop due to lack of funds UKSE quickly offered a grant of 11,500 which also helped a lot of the people get coaching qualifications which have lead to employment and new careers.

It was nice to see how positive people were about the future of my home and where I live because it made the future in general look brighter.

Declan's blog 24/06/2016

    Blog 3 Today I visited The Admin Centre and saw what a beneficial job they do in reducing unemployment in both youth and older people. The innovative idea...

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Should 16 year old people be allowed to vote?

 

 

 

 In my opinion 16 year olds should be allowed to vote because politics affects everyone and although some people say that a 16 year old wouldn’t know what’s good for the country neither do some of the adults and in actual fact that isn’t the case as they learn about major political issues at school meaning they have an insight in to what’s happening in our country and actually know more about this than some of the adults who don’t know who to vote for or why they’re voting the way they are.

The decisions that are made today on things such as university fees and higher education as a whole is going to affect the 16/17 year olds much more so than the pensions however the older people get to decide who they want choosing what happens with higher education so why can’t the people who it’s actually going to affect vote?

16 year olds are given responsibilities such as the transition into further education, work or an apprenticeship; the eligibility to pay tax, join the armed forces, get married and have a child. All of these have been brought up in parliament multiple times by the people who were elected by people eligible to vote but will largely affect competent young people, who  the majority of, know what they’re talking about and have formed views on topics that will greatly affect their lives.

This would also make 16 /17 year old people more informed of what is happening in the country because they know it is a big responsibility to vote but I believe they would use that and make an effort to learn more about the different parties views which would make us a smarter society on a whole,but also gives them a view which if they could vote would  give them a say in what happens which could make the country a better place.

Should the voting age be lowered to 16?

    Should 16 year old people be allowed to vote?        In my opinion 16 year olds should be allowed to vote because politics affects everyone and...

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