Nic Dakin MP

Standing up for Local People

Young People

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There are five bodies that run the European Union. These are:

  • European Parliament
  • Council of the Union
  • European Commission
  • Court of Justice
  • Court of Auditors

European Parliament

The European Parliament is a directly elected group of 751 members from all member states. The amount of members from each state depends on the population of it. The election for the European Parliament are held every five years.

The three main responsibilities are legislative, supervisory and budgetary. They pass laws and establish the budget while working with the Council of the Union.

Their work comes from two mains stages- committees and summary voting sessions.

Council of the Union

The Council of the European Union was formed in 1958 and is the voice of the member governments. They adopt EU laws and coordinate policies.

It’s formed from government ministers from each country and changes depending on the policy area being discussed. The presidency of the Council rotates around each member state every six months.

They also work with the European Parliament to pass laws and to form the budget. The Council also develops the foreign and security policy of the EU, coordinates the policies of member states. They also conclude agreements between EU, other countries or international organisations.

European Commission

The European Commission is a politically independent executive part of the EU. It’s made up of a team of commissioners- one from each EU country.

The Commissions functions include proposing new laws that protect the interests of the EU and its citizens on issues that can’t be dealt with effectively at a national level and getting technical details right by checking with the public and experts.

Another function is to set the spending priorities along with the Council and Parliament. They draw up annual budgets to be approved and supervises how the money is spent.

They also work with the Court of Justice to ensure that EU law is applied correctly in member states and to represent the EU. They speak of the behalf of the EU in international bodies and negotiates international agreements.

Court of Justice

The Court of Justice works to interpret EU law to ensure that it is applied the same way in all countries and to settle legal disputes between national governments and EU institutions. The most common cases brought before it are ones involving: interpreting the law, enforcing the law, annulling EU acts, ensuring EU takes action and sanctioning EU institutions.

The Court is split into three bodies who are the Court of Justice, the General Court and the Civil Service Tribunal. Each judge and advocate general is appointed for 6 years on a renewable term and in each Court, the judges select a president for a term of 3 years.

Each court has a different formation. In the Court of Justice there are 1 judge from each EU country and 11 advocates general. The General Court composes of 1 judge from each EU country and the Civil Service Tribunal composes of 7 judges.

Court of Auditors

The Court of Auditors is the EU's independent external auditor who looks after the interests of the EU taxpayers. The Court of Auditors composes of 1 member from each member country.

It has no legal powers but instead works to improve the European Commission’s management of the budget reports on the finances of the EU. They check all EU funds are collected and correctly used and help to improve financial management.

They carry out three types of audit. These are financial, compliance and performance. Each audit group is divided into groups called chambers who prepare reports and opinions for Court members to adopt and make official.

 

Jessica's Blog: EU Structure

There are five bodies that run the European Union. These are: European Parliament Council of the Union European Commission Court of Justice Court of Auditors European Parliament The European Parliament...

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My name is Dan and I’m currently at John Leggott College, studying A-level Politics, History and English Literature. I intend to pursue a career in the field of politics in the future.

I’ve been volunteering intermittently at Nic’s constituency office since the age of 14; which has allowed me a clear insight into the daily routines of an active politician. This opportunity has even allowed me to canvass alongside Nic in the 2015 general Election.

I hope to continue learning from the experience I’m gaining at Nic’s constituency office, which will assist me further with my academic plans of going to university and gaining a job within politics.

Dan's Blog 24/04/2016

My name is Dan and I’m currently at John Leggott College, studying A-level Politics, History and English Literature. I intend to pursue a career in the field of politics in...

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Like many people, I don’t know too much about the details and background of the EU, other than the occasional facts from the media. I decided to write a weekly blog looking at the different bits of the EU. Today, I focused my research on the background of the EU.

The EU stands for the European Union and is a union of 28 counties, including the UK who joined in 1973. Some of the main reasons countries like the UK join the EU are:

  • To prevent another war or conflict happening within Europe- like World War 1 and 2
  • To respect human rights
  • To form a common economic area

The EU aim to develop Europe as an area of freedom, security and justice.

Countries within the EU pay to be a member through taxes though they also profit from being a member. In 2011, almost half of the UK goods and services were exported to the EU.

A common economic area means that if a country exports something to another country within the EU, they don’t have to pay for any export tariffs that may be added if exporting to a country outside the EU. As the UK exports so many goods to EU countries, this means a lot of money is saved.

The EU means free movement of goods, services, capital and people can happen. This is why a UK citizen can travel to and live or work within an EU country for as long as they wish, without the need for a visa. They can also pass legislation on home affairs and justice as well as maintaining policies on other matters such as agriculture.

Next week, I will be looking at the five main bodies that run the EU and what they do different from each other.

Jessica's Blog: Background of the EU

Like many people, I don’t know too much about the details and background of the EU, other than the occasional facts from the media. I decided to write a weekly...

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Last week I spent the day with Nic doing a variety of activities. I began by photocopying a petition that was brought to Nic regarding supporting local pharmacies. After this I went with Nic to TATA Steel Scunthorpe where two interviews were being filmed for the media. It was extremely interesting to see the events that occur behind the camera when filming. I also had the opportunity to sit in on meetings with constituents and to see the wide range of issues brought to the attention of a local MP. To end my day, I went with Nic and two others to go campaigning. This gave me an opportunity to see the other side of things that happen outside of an office- the campaigning that actually takes place and how it works. We walked door to door asking each household simple questions such as which party they are inclined to vote for, their opinion on the European Union referendum and about the PCC election. As the information was gathered I then recorded it onto the documents. We also visited the angel statue to take photographs to use for a piece that went onto Nic’s page.

Today I partook in another variety of activities. I began by researching and drafting a piece for Nic to edit and then use for publishing on his website. I then went on to do a piece of casework myself. In doing this I began by ringing the local authorities for information on the matter before forming an email to then send for further information on this matter. I went on to write a brief piece regarding the Rock the House competition and then publishing this on social media.

Finally other both the two weeks I began to organise my own trip to the Houses of Parliament during the summer, to see how the actual office in Parliament runs. This will be an extremely interesting experience for me to have as being inside Parliament will be very different to being in a constituency office.

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Jessica's Blog: Update on the Last Two Weeks

Last week I spent the day with Nic doing a variety of activities. I began by photocopying a petition that was brought to Nic regarding supporting local pharmacies. After this...

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Recently I was lucky to have the opportunity to visit Christs Church, part of the University of Cambridge. The buildings at the university vary in many aspects, from age to style, and were simply breath-taking. The simplest things beautiful, from the grounds to the buildings.

Upon arrival, we listened to a talk about the process of applying to university, both in general and for Cambridge which gave us all useful tips for our own applications. The tips that we were given were the extremely interesting factors that could give us an edge against other candidates.

We were then taken for a tour of Christs Church College where we found out various things from the college, from the societies available to the traditions that occur. The campus and its grounds were one of the most stunning sights I have seen, beauty simply radiated from the college.

The true highlight of the day in my opinion was the visit to the main library for the University of Cambridge. We began by visiting the exhibition that they had which included the earliest ever evidence of writing and actual works by both writers and scientists. To see the real work that was done by people such as Charles Darwin and Isaac Newton, in their own handwriting was an amazing experience that cannot be put into words. When we moved into the main library it was beautiful. The library is one of the few which possesses a copy of all books published in the United Kingdom which shows how vast this library is. Everywhere you looked the books were countless and varying in fields to anything you could ever need for your work. Study spaces were located in all different areas, providing a perfect place for work to be done. The library really was a beautiful place which I aspire to visit again. Whilst touring the library we were lucky enough to walk past a well-known author and Professor of Classics at Cambridge, Mary Beard.

When you visit a place like Cambridge, you visit with certain expectations. But when I visited I found it wasn't how I expected at all, all the stereotypes I had pictured were blown away. It was such a beautiful place and the students and staff that we met there were some of the loveliest people I have met. 

Jessica's Blog - Visit to Cambridge University

Recently I was lucky to have the opportunity to visit Christs Church, part of the University of Cambridge. The buildings at the university vary in many aspects, from age to...

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